One Teacher Un-‘masks’ Their Views On Virtual Learning

NPHS Teacher Deanna Parrillo reveals her optimistic opinions about Virtual Learning as a result of Covid-19.

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Samuel Loranger, News Editor

As Covid-19 cases pop up more and more at NPHS, teachers and students have started predicting when we will make the switch to full virtualization. NPHS was the first public school in the state to have to send all students and teachers home for two weeks to quarantine.

On October 5th, Principal Magill said in an email to parents, students, and staff, “After RIDOH contact tracing, approximately 90-100 students are required to be quarantined through October 13 for some students or October 17 for other students. Additionally, and as a result, NPHS currently has approximately 16-20 staff absences and unfilled positions related to quarantine/COVID during this time period.”

Students and staff have since returned to NPHS on a hybrid model of learning. Teachers have had to adjust their curriculums for fully online students, in person students, and a mixture of both. 

English teacher, Deanna Parrillo, said in a statement to Cougar Courier, “The shift to distance and hybrid learning has definitely pushed me to incorporate more technology tools into my teaching.  I am using Google Classroom as a primary avenue to communicate with my students, as well as the way that I assign, collect and assess student work.  I also use other websites such as No Red Ink and AP Classroom more than ever, as a way to equally reach my in-person and virtual learners.”

Parrillo and other teachers have had to make many changes in the way they teach in the regular school year.

“As for what can be improved on, I think that the biggest concern I have is my ability to form relationships with ALL of my students, whether they are in person or distance learners.  It is sometimes difficult to get to know students through a computer screen, so I am making it a priority to devote extra energy this year to reaching out to distance learners to ensure that they are understanding all class content, as well as know how to ask for help when they need it.”